1.jpg

PSAT

The Preliminary SAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test is a standardized test administered by the College Board and cosponsored by the National Merit Scholarship Corporation in the United States. The PSAT is free for 10th graders and $16 for 9th and 11th graders. Click the link below to register for the upcoming PSAT testing date on October 10, 2018.

 

WHAT IS THE PSAT?

The Benefits of Taking the PSAT

PSAT-NMSQT.jpg

The PSAT does not count towards your college admissions applications, but it is the qualifying test for the National Merit Scholarship. Some of the highest scoring students may win scholarship money, so while you shouldn’t stress out about the PSAT, you certainly shouldn’t ignore it either. Use the PSAT as practice for the SAT and ACT and an important guidepost on your college admissions journey.

The PSAT has two sections: Math and Evidence-Based Reading and Writing. Each section is scored on a scale of 160–760, making a “perfect” score 1520. There are also test scores, cross-test scores, and subscores. The PSAT and SAT tests are almost identical: the PSAT is 15 minutes shorter, does not include an essay, and has a slightly different scoring scale. By prepping for the SAT, you are prepping for both tests! 

 
1.jpg

SAT AND ACT

The SAT and ACT are entrance exams used by most colleges and universities to make admissions decisions. Both exams are a multiple-choice, pencil-and-paper test. 


The purpose of these exams is to measure a high school student's readiness for college, and provide colleges with one common data point that can be used to compare all applicants. 

 

SAT VS ACT

What is the difference between the SAT exam and the ACT exam?

satpic.jpg

SAT

Administered by College Board

Purpose

  • Colleges use SAT scores for admissions and merit-based scholarships.


Test Structure

  • Reading

  • Writing & Language

  • Math

  • Essay (Optional)

Test Duration

  • 3 hours (without essay)

  • 3 hours, 50 minutes (with essay)

Reading

  • 5 reading passages

Science

  • None

Math

  • Arithmetic

  • Algebra I & II

  • Geometry, Trigonometry and Data Analysis

  • Calculator and No Calculator Sections

Essay

  • Optional. The essay will test your comprehension of a source text.

Scoring

  • Scale of 400 -1600

  • Average score is 1060

Cost

  • $46 No Essay

  • $60 SAT with Essay

act_logo.jpeg

ACT

Administered by ACT, Inc.

Purpose

  • Colleges use ACT scores for admissions and merit-based scholarships.

Test Structure

  • English

  • Math

  • Reading

  • Science Reasoning

  • Essay (Optional)

Test Duration

  • 2 hours, 55 minutes (without essay)

  • 3 hours, 40 minutes (with essay)

Reading

  • 4 reading passages

Science

  • 1 science section testing your critical thinking skills (not specific science knowledge)

Math

  • Arithmetic

  • Algebra I & II

  • Geometry, Trigonometry, and Probability & Statistics

  • All sections allow the use of a calculator

Essay

  •  Optional. The essay will test how well you evaluate and analyze complex issues.

Scoring

  • Range of 1 - 36

  • Average score is 21

Cost

  • $46 No Writing

  • $62.50 ACT with Writing

Most colleges and universities will accept scores from either the SAT or ACT and do not favor one test over the other. As a result, college-bound students are increasingly taking both the SAT and ACT. The best way to decide if taking the SAT, ACT, or both tests is right for you is to take a timed full-length practice test of each type. 

  

 
satpic.jpg

SAT

Administered by College Board

Purpose

  • Colleges use SAT scores for admissions and merit-based scholarships.


Test Structure

  • Reading

  • Writing & Language

  • Math

  • Essay (Optional)

Test Duration

  • 3 hours (without essay)

  • 3 hours, 50 minutes (with essay)

Reading

  • 5 reading passages

Science

  • None

Math

  • Arithmetic

  • Algebra I & II

  • Geometry, Trigonometry and Data Analysis

  • Calculator and No Calculator Sections

Essay

  • Optional. The essay will test your comprehension of a source text.

Scoring

  • Scale of 400 -1600

  • Average score is 1060

Cost

  • $46 No Essay

  • $60 SAT with Essay

act_logo.jpeg

ACT

Administered by ACT, Inc.

Purpose

  • Colleges use ACT scores for admissions and merit-based scholarships.

Test Structure

  • English

  • Math

  • Reading

  • Science Reasoning

  • Essay (Optional)

Test Duration

  • 2 hours, 55 minutes (without essay)

  • 3 hours, 40 minutes (with essay)

Reading

  • 4 reading passages

Science

  • 1 science section testing your critical thinking skills (not specific science knowledge)

Math

  • Arithmetic

  • Algebra I & II

  • Geometry, Trigonometry, and Probability & Statistics

  • All sections allow the use of a calculator

Essay

  •  Optional. The essay will test how well you evaluate and analyze complex issues.

Scoring

  • Range of 1 - 36

  • Average score is 21

Cost

  • $46 No Writing

  • $62.50 ACT with Writing

1.jpg

ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) EXAMS

Administered by College Board

AP Tests take place at the end of AP classes and they’re used as a means of assessing how much you learned in the class and whether your experience merits college credit.

AP exams are scored on a scale from 1 to 5, 5 being the highest score and 1 being the lowest. This is how the College Board defines each score:

5 = extremely well qualified 
4 = well qualified
3 = qualified
2 = possibly qualified
1 = no recommendation

“Qualified” indicates that you’re capable of doing the equivalent of the work required for a college-level introductory course in the AP subject. Most colleges will give credit for students scoring 4s or 5s on AP tests, and some will even give credit for 3s. This can vary depending on the test. 

Every AP exam has a multiple choice section, which is scored by computer, and a free response or essay section, which is scored by college professors and AP teachers. Scores on the two sections of AP Tests are combined to form your composite score on a scale of 1 to 5. Scaling is different for each exam, but in general even if you only get 70% of the questions correct, you can still end up with a 5.